Food safety

Take the chicken challenge!

Let's hear it for the humble chicken. We love it. It's a healthy and versatile food, bringing us all together around the table for Sunday lunch and out with the barbecue on sunny afternoons.

But there's just one thing we don't love about it. Chicken can cause food poisoning.

About 280,000 cases of food poisoning a year can be traced to Campylobacter - a germ found mostly on raw chicken. You can’t see it, smell it or even taste it on food, but if it affects you, you won’t forget it.

Campylobacter food poisoning usually develops a few days after eating contaminated food and leads to symptoms that include abdominal pain, severe diarrhoea and sometimes vomiting.

What can you do?

Graphic showing symptoms and how to avaid getting campylobacterWe are asking you to take a pledge to:

  • Bag and store raw chicken separately from other food, covered and chilled on the bottom shelf of the fridge
  • Not to wash raw chicken as it splashes germs
  • Wash everything that’s touched raw chicken in soap and hot water – your hands and utensils
  • Check chicken is cooked properly - no pink meat, steaming hot and the juices run clear.

What is campylobacter?

Campylobacter is the generic name for a number of species of bacteria that can cause food poisoning in people. They cause more cases of food poisoning in the UK than salmonella, E.coli and listeria combined.

Campylobacter bacteria are commonly found on poultry meat. Between 50% and 80% of cases of campylobacter food poisoning in the UK and other EU countries can be attributed to poultry sources, mostly to raw poultry meat.

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